How to take care of Your Teeth When Traveling

Going camping, hiking in the mountains, seeing the sights, are all things that we love to do, but what about your oral health? What are you going to do about that? There are many things that you can do, but if you’re venturing out to the mountains, you need to ensure that you have the best results possible.

If you go hiking, you need to bring the most basic necessities, especially since you’re carrying a backpack or limited suitcases in many cases. Obviously, if you’re roughing it and going to the mountains, you need to make sure that you don’t bring too much, since you won’t last long. It can be hard to pack for trips like this, but you need to make sure that you have space in your bag and try to put together a small case to carry everything. What are the most important things to take? Well, you’re about to find out.

The first and most obvious one is a travel toothbrush and toothpaste. Obviously, you don’t need to bring a huge tube unless you’re going out for a month. If you bring one of those travel ones, it can actually fit straight not the side pocket, and the toothbrushes are foldable, so they’re super easy to pack.

Now, while carrying a toothbrush is easy, water might not be as such. You should make sure that you try to bring as much water as you can. It can be challenging since there are limited sources of clean water in the mountains. There is always that risk of getting beaver fever or drinking fecal matter from the water as well. It might seem clean, but it really isn’t.

One of the best ways to carry water is to get one of those arm carriers that are attached to your arms and legs. Bring as much as you can. However, if you run out, and you need water, because you’ve already use it for drinking, you can boil it. You should try to carry a small pot and some matchsticks, and make sure it gets full boil so that all microorganisms are killed in it. a thermometer might be a good thing if you’re going this route.

If you don’t have the ability to floss, you can use a small stick to clean out the food in between your teeth. You can create this yourself by taking a stick off of a branch and even shaping it using a knife. However, make sure it’s safe to put inside your mouth. That is because some sticks are attached to poisonous plants, and the last thing you want is poison ivy on your mouth, that’s for sure. The ideal thing to do is to try and put a small package of floss in there if possible, and if you can’t, try to add a few toothpicks that you can use throughout your trip. Also, you should know your poisonous plants period, and that’s something that will protect you overall.

Finally, invest in a mouth guard, since mountaineering can be dangerous, and you never know what will happen. There are cases where an accident might happen, and you end up cracking or injuring your teeth. There are times when you fall too, and that isn’t something you want to worry about. Also, remember that you’re in the mountains, where you might not get perfect cell phone signal either, so if something happens, you might be on our own for a while. It’s best to protect yourself as much as you can, and invest in a mouth guard to help with this.

The mountains are a great place to go for hiking, and there is so much to see and do. But of course, you should never compensate your oral health in these cases. Be smart, carry what you need, and make sure that you take care of your teeth and mouth. This is something that can change everything for the better, and if you take care of it now, you’ll have an even better trip up in the mountains, and you’ll be able to maintain the health of your teeth despite roughing it out there.

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